Question: When to use was and were?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they.

When to use were instead of was?

Was is used in the first and third person singular past. It is used for statements of fact. Were is used in the second person singular and plural and first and third person plural. It is used in the subjunctive mood to indicate unreal or hypothetical statements.

How do u use were in a sentence?

Use were as a past tense verb, as the: First-person plural of be (We were busy last week.) Second-person singular and plural of be (You were busy last week.) Third-person plural of be (They were busy last week.)

Which is correct if it was or if it were grammar?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation. The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect. However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice.

Why do we say if I were?

Why do you use IF I WERE and not IF I WAS? The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you).

Can we say I were?

I were is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when youre are talking about something that isnt true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick... <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. I was is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

What is were in present tense?

Meaning - Were is the past tense of the verb are. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

What is the difference between wear and Ware?

Ware is pottery, porcelain, silver or any other manufactured articles of a specific type. Ware comes from the Old English word waru meaning article of merchandise. Wear means 1.) to have on ones person, to carry on ones person, 2.) to erode, 3.) to tire, to cause fatigue, 4.) to hold a rank, 5.)

Is it correct to say if it were?

A good trick to decide which you want to use is to determine if the thing you are talking about is something that actually happened or something that you are wishing or imagining might have happened. If it really happened, use “if I was,” but if not, go with “if I were.”

What is correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense. If the subject is in plural form, the verb should also be in plur al form (and vice versa).

Where do we use were?

When to use were Whereas was is the singular past tense of to be, were is used for both the third person plural past tense (they and we) and the second person past tense (you). In the past indicative, were acts similar to was. “They were at the store,” you could say, for example.

Is it grammatically correct to say if I were you?

From my research online the correct way is to say If I were you and not If I was you because this is the subjunctive mood. However they dont say the underlying reason for it. They just say use If I were you when it is subjunctive.

Can we use were in present tense?

Meaning - Were is the past tense of the verb are. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use. SUGGESTION: To test whether were is the correct word to use in a sentence, see if you can use are in its place, putting the sentence into the present tense.

Is had past or present?

The past tense and past participle form is had. The present and past forms are often contracted in everyday speech, especially when have is being used as an auxiliary verb.

Is it wear or ware off?

Wear is seldom used as a noun, except in compound words like outerwear and underwear. Therefore, if the word you are using is a noun, you probably need ware. Wear, meanwhile, is a verb, so if a verb is what you need, wear is the best choice. Ware vs.

Is it ware off or wear off?

Ware off is simply incorrect regardless of whether were talking British or American English. It is not in use at all.

How can I check if a sentence is correct online?

Grammarly has a tool for just about every kind of writing you do. The online grammar checker is perfect for users who need a quick check for their text.

How do I check my grammar on Google?

Google Grammar and Spell Check To do so, open the Tools menu and click Spelling and grammar, then click Check spelling and grammar. A box will open letting you step through each of Google Docs grammar and spelling suggestions. Its up to you whether to accept or ignore the programs recommendations.

What is difference between were and where?

Were is the past tense of be when used as a verb. Where means in a specific place when used as an adverb or conjunction. A good way to remember the difference is that where has an h for home, and home is a place. Were is one of the past tense forms of the verb be.

Is if I were a boy grammatically correct?

You should always use the subjunctive after if to suggest a hypothetical situation e.g. if I were lucky, if it were to rain, if I were a boy, if I were you. But in casual, informal, spoken language, many people use the present tense e.g. if I was lucky, if it was to rain, if I was a boy, if I was you.

Is has present or past tense?

Have and has indicate possession in the present tense (describing events that are currently happening). Have is used with the pronouns I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it.

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